HELP! I HAVE A STUDENT WHO DOES NOT KNOW ENGLISH!

WELCOME!

 

Hello,

I am Teresa Moore, a graduate of the  ESL program at Georgetown College in Georgetown, Kentucky. I understand the frustration you are feeling at the idea of being unable to communicate with a student who is limited in English.

I want to offer some tips here and I hope you will use my blog as a resource.    Scroll  to the bottom of the page to find helpful  links pertaining to your ELL.

Please feel free to share my blog with your colleagues and if you want more help, I hope you will leave a comment and I will be happy to help.

SOME STEPS:

1) Be professional, you can do this!

2) Check your school district site to locate information pertaining to English Language Learners. If you have a district coordinator, that person’s name will be listed on your school district’s site. Get to know this person, they were employed to help you.

3) Locate your building ESL teacher(s) and meet them, send e- mail or go to their classroom and begin open communication with them. This person was employed to help you.

4) If you have no ESL teacher or ESL coordinator in your district, contact your administrator to discuss the academic and legal ramifications pertaining to your English Language Learner(s).

5) Become familiar with these terms:

* Home Language Survey- A Survey to determine if a student needs services.

* W-apt- This is a test that is administered to ELLs within 30 days after the beginning of school or 10 days after enrollment during the school year. This determines placement of the ELL.

6) Ask your ESL teacher to explain the level of your ELL student. (beginning, bridging, developing, etc.)

7) Based on the level of your student, you can select strategies to help your ELLs meet your objectives.
* CHECK THE CAN DO ON MY BLOG FOR MORE HELP.

8) Use your ESL teacher as a resource.

2 Comments

2 thoughts on “HELP! I HAVE A STUDENT WHO DOES NOT KNOW ENGLISH!

  1. My name is Kamal Sharma (kuh-muhl shuhr-mah). I read your article ‘linguistic analysis of nepali and english’. I really liked the analysis and the things you pointed out are indeed real.
    But there are even more phonemes which are pronounced wrong and few things that you have mentioned are incorrect like /v/ and /h/. /v/ is completely absent while /h/ is mainly pronounced when it is in the begining (but is not absent).
    Great work…

    • Kamal,

      Thank you so much for reading the project. It was extremely long and took a tremendous amount of research both in school and online. Thanks so much for responding.

      Teresa

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *